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Raila Odinga Biography, Wikipedia, Wife, Networth, Family, House

Raila Odinga Biography, Wikipedia, Wife, Networth, Family, House

Raila Amolo Odinga is a Kenyan politician, former MP for Langata, and businessman who was Prime Minister of Kenya from 2008 to 2013. He was born on January 7, 1945. It was 2013, and he is thought to be the leader of the opposition in Kenya. Odinga was the presidential candidate for ODM under the Azimio La Umoja Coalition in the presidential elections held in August 2022. On June 5, 2022, the IEBC gave him the green light to run for president. Before this, he ran for president four times but lost each time: in 1997, 2007, 2013, and 2017.

Raila Amolo Odinga

Full Name Raila Amolo Odinga
Date of Birth  7 January 1945 (age 77)
Spouse   Ida Betty Odinga
Children  4, including Rosemary
Political party Orange Democratic Movement
Title / Office:  prime minister (2008-2013), Kenya
Education  Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg
Founder National Rainbow Coalition
Relatives Oginga Odinga (father) Oburu Odinga (brother)

 Early life and education

Kenya Colony

Raila Odinga was born on January 7, 1945, in Maseno, Kisumu District, Nyanza Province, at the Anglican Church Missionary Society Hospital. His parents were Mary Juma Odinga and Jaramogi Oginga Odinga. Under President Jomo Kenyatta, his father was Kenya’s first Vice President. He is from the Luo group of people. He went to Kisumu Union Primary School and Maranda High School, where he stayed until his father sent him to Germany in 1962.

East Germany

He spent the next two years at the Herder Institution, which taught foreign students the German language and was part of the philology faculty at the University of Leipzig in East Germany. He got a scholarship paid for him to go to the Technische Hochschule in Magdeburg, which is now a part of Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg. He went there in 1965. In 1970, he got a Diplom in Mechanical Engineering and Welding, which is about the same as a master’s degree. During the Cold War, he was a Kenyan student in East Germany. He was able to go to West Berlin through Checkpoint Charlie. When he went to West Berlin, he would bring his friends in East Germany things that couldn’t be bought in East Berlin.

Career

Business and entrepreneurship

Odinga moved back to Kenya in 1970. In 1971, he started a company called Standard Processing Equipment Construction & Erection Ltd, which was later renamed East African Spectre. It was the only company in Kenya that made liquid petroleum gas cylinders.

Civil service career
Odinga was put in charge of group standards at the Kenya Bureau of Standards in 1974. After 4 years in this job, he was moved up to be the deputy director in 1978. He stayed in this job until he was arrested in 1982.

Political career

1982 Kenyan coup attempt

At 3 am on August 1, 1982, a group of Kenya Air Force soldiers led by Senior Private Hezekiah Ochuka tried to overthrow the government of Daniel Arap Moi, who was president at the time. After the failed attempt to get rid of him, President Moi reorganized Kenya’s security system and filled it with people who were loyal to him. He then got a law passed in parliament that gave him emergency powers and put the administration of the provinces under the president’s office. Odinga was arrested and charged with treason because it was thought that he was one of the people who planned the 1982 coup. Six years later, in February 1988, he was freed, but he was arrested again in August of the same year. He was freed again in June 1989.

Presidential elections

2007 presidential election

On July 12, 2007, as Kibaki’s reelection bid was coming to a close, Odinga said that the government was keeping ID cards from voters in strongholds of the opposition in order to tilt the election in Kibaki’s favor. He also said that the plan to make 30 new constituencies was a way for the government to win the parliamentary election in December 2007 by cheating.

Odinga’s own Orange Democratic Movement-Kenya had a setback in August 2007 when it split into two groups. Odinga became the leader of the Orange Democratic Movement (ODM), while Kalonzo Musyoka took over the ODM-K after leaving Odinga.

At a National Delegates Conference on September 1, 2007, held at the Moi International Sports Center in Nairobi, Odinga was chosen as the ODM’s presidential candidate. Odinga got 2,656 votes, and the only other candidates who got a lot of votes were Musalia Mudavadi (391 votes) and William Ruto (368 votes). Earlier, Najib Balala had dropped out of the race and given his support to Odinga. After losing, the other candidates said they would vote for Odinga, and Mudavadi was chosen as his running mate. Odinga’s attempt to become president failed, though, when, after the presidential election on December 27, 2007, the Electoral Commission declared Kibaki the winner on December 30, 2007, giving him about 232,000 more votes than Odinga. Jeffrey Sachs, a professor of economics at Columbia University, is the director of the Earth Institute, and was a special advisor to the former UN secretary general. He said that the way the US handled the crisis after the election was wrong, and he suggested that the votes be counted again by a third party. Odinga and his wife, Ida Odinga, pose for a photo with President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama at a reception at the Metropolitan Museum in New York.

Odinga and the leaders of his party, the ODM, got together to protest the decision. James Orengo and Prof. Nyong’o called for a large-scale response. After that, there was violence in the country. The government’s response to the public protests was harsh, as police and paramilitary units were sent out to stop them. After two months of fighting that killed about 1,000 people and forced about 250,000 people to leave their homes, Odinga and Kibaki signed a deal in February 2008 that split power between them and created the position of Prime Minister. The deal was brokered by Kofi Annan, who had been UN Secretary-General. Odinga was sworn in as Prime Minister on April 17, 2008, along with the Cabinet that shares power. Jomo Kenyatta was the last person to be Prime Minister after the country got its independence. He was in charge from 1963 to 1964. Odinga is the second person in Kenya’s history to hold this position. Odinga was supposed to run for president again in March 2013, when Kibaki would hand over power. Odinga’s main opponents, Uhuru Kenyatta and William Ruto, were both indicted by the International Criminal Court (ICC) of the Hague for their alleged roles in the 2007 election violence. This created a lot of uncertainty. Even though their case was still going on, the Jubilee party chose Uhuru as their presidential candidate and Ruto as their running mate. Many people thought they shouldn’t run for office until they cleared their names of such serious crimes. Others thought their opponents were trying to take advantage of the situation to get rid of them and make it easy for them to win. Odinga’s party, the Orange Democratic Movement (ODM), joined forces with Kalonzo Musyoka’s Wiper Party and Moses Wetangula’s Ford Kenya (FK) to form a coalition called CORD (Coalition for Reforms and Democracy) for the presidential race. Odinga was the presidential candidate, and Kalonzo was his running mate. They were going up against the Jubilee coalition, which was made up of Uhuru Kenyatta’s, William

Several western countries did not support Uhuru and Ruto’s candidacy because they were facing charges from the International Criminal Court (ICC) and were linked to crimes against humanity. Former Raila OdingaUN Secretary General Koffi Annan and former US Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs Johnnie Carson both said they were worried about Uhuru Kenyatta and William Ruto getting elected. He was quoted as saying, “Choices have consequences,” which was about what would happen to US-Kenyan relations if Uhuru became president.

Odinga, the Prime Minister of Kenya, with, from left, Pierre Nkurunziza, the President of Burundi, Bingu Wa Mutharika, the President of Malawi, Thabo Mbeki, the President of South Africa, Klaus Schwab, the Founder and Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum, and John Agyekum Kufuor, the President of Ghana, at the Opening Plenary of the World Economic Forum on Africa 2008 in Cape Town, South Africa, on June 4, 2008.

Odinga ran for president in the March 4, 2013 elections. Out of the 12,221,053 valid votes cast, he got 5,340,546 (43.70%). Uhuru Kenyatta won with 6,173,433 votes, which is 50.51%. As this was more than 50% plus one vote, Uhuru won on the first round and there was no need for a second round between the top two candidates. So, at 2:44 pm on Saturday, March 9, the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC) made Uhuru Kenyatta the president-elect. Uhuru was about to become the 4th president of Kenya. Odinga, however, said at a press conference right after the results were announced that the election had been ruined by massive failures of the Biometric Voter Registration (BVR) kits, EVID (electronic voter identification or “Pollbooks”), RTS (results transmission system or “tallying system”), and the RPS (results presentation or “transmissions system”). He said that the manual counting was shady, so he had no choice but to challenge the results in Kenya’s highest court, The Supreme Court.

Odinga and his lawyers, George Oraro, Mutula Kilonzo, and James Orengo, secretly asked Raj Pal Senna, a Management Consultant from Barcelona, to do a forensic investigation of the technology used in the 2013 Kenyan General Election, when the IEBC said on TV and in the media that there were “technical challenges,” that servers were overloaded, and that the database crashed.

On March 11, Kenya’s chief justice, Dr. Willy Mutunga, said that the Supreme Court was now fully formed and ready to make decisions within 14 days, as Kenya’s Constitution requires.

During the hearing for the Petition, Chief Justice Willy Mutunga ruled that Odinga’s second affidavit, which was 900 pages long, was not valid because it was “new evidence,” which is against the Constitution. On March 30, 2013, the Supreme Court made a decision to throw out the petition. Even though the Supreme Court said that Uhuru would be the next president, it also said that the IEBC should not have counted invalid or “spoilt” votes in the final numbers and percentages. Chief Justice Willy Mutunga also told the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission (EACC) and the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) to look into whether the IEBC did anything illegal with the BVR, EVID, RTS, and RPS. Odinga went to South Africa after the supreme court denied his petition. He didn’t want to go to the inauguration of Uhuru Kenyatta on April 9, 2013, at the Moi Sports Complex in Kasarani, Nairobi. The end of his time as prime minister was marked by the swearing-in ceremony. The full results of the investigation were published as the OpCo Report on the website www.kenya-legal.com. This was a big deal, and it led KTN journalists John Namu and Mohammed Ali to make the documentary “50+1: The Inside Story.” This documentary looks at the history of election fraud and corruption in the Judiciary. In it, Odinga says that it can’t be proven that the Court didn’t look at the technical evidence because doing so would invalidate the whole election process and hurt the reputation of the IEBC.

2017 presidential elections

Claims of election rigging

Odinga’s lawyers, James Orengo, Otiende Amollo, and Clifford Ochieng, said that people working for his main opponent, Uhuru Kenyatta, had hacked into the IEBC server and changed the database. He said that the results being sent by IEBC were fake because they had been changed by a computer algorithm that was designed to keep an 11% gap between his votes and Uhuru’s votes. So, he showed that the votes weren’t real votes from real people. Instead, they were the result of a computer formula that made up fake values. He also said that this hacking into IEBC’s system affected not just the presidential election results, but the whole election, including votes for MPs, senators, governors, and women representatives. He said that what he thought was going on was “the biggest vote theft in Kenya’s history.” Later, while vote counting was still going on and the country was waiting for the final results to be announced, Odinga said that his team had heard from a confidential source in the IEBC that results from its server put him in the lead with 8 million votes to Uhuru’s 7 million. He asked that he be made the fifth president of Kenya because of this. But the IEBC didn’t agree with Odinga, saying that the winner couldn’t be announced until all the votes were counted and that, as an independent body, it couldn’t be forced to do so by one of the candidates. The IEBC finally released the results, which showed that Uhuru had won with 8.2 million votes to Odinga’s 6.7 million. The results showed that NASA lost a lot, and Jubilee attacked NASA’s strongholds. NASA wouldn’t accept the results. Shortly after Uhuru said he had won, there was violence in parts of the country where the opposition has a lot of power. But the violence wasn’t as bad as it was after the election in 2007, and it didn’t happen all the time. Odinga and President Kenyatta both asked people to be quiet.

Annulment of the presidential election

Odinga first decided not to take his case to court because he thought the court had already ruled against him. He later changed his mind and filed a petition.

After two days of hearings, the judges ruled on September 1 that the presidential election results were invalid and that a new election must be held within 60 days. The court’s decision, which was read by Chief Justice David Maraga and was seen as a first both in Africa and around the world, was that the IEBC did not run the election the way the Constitution said it should, so it could not stand.

Odinga announced on October 10 that he would not run for president on October 26, despite the Supreme Court’s decision.

He quit because he thought the election would not be free or fair again, since no changes had been made to the voting process since the last election was thrown out, and because several people from his coalition had left.

Later, the IEBC said that Odinga had not officially dropped out of the race for president and that his name would still be on the ballot on October 26 along with the names of other candidates who ran in the General Elections on August 8.

This caused a lot of violence in different parts of the country a few days before and after the re-vote, especially in areas where NASA had a lot of power. Independent Medic Research Organization (IMLU) pointed to 39 deaths and a high number of assaults as evidence of what was said to be police brutality.

Swearing in of People’s President, and reconciliation

Odinga held a swearing-in ceremony on January 30 in Nairobi. He called himself the “People’s President” at the event. After this ceremony, TV stations across Kenya stopped broadcasting. A month and a half later, on March 9, Odinga and president Uhuru Kenyatta appeared on TV together. They called each other “brothers” and agreed to put their political differences aside so that Kenya could move forward.

2022 presidential elections

I, Raila Amolo Odinga, have been faithful and committed to building a national, democratic, and progressive Kenya during our lifetimes. I have worked with many patriotic Kenyans to reach this goal, and I accept the request and unanimous decision of this Azimio la Umoja to run for president on August 9, 2022.

Political positions

Odinga’s political philosophy is more like American left-wing politics than it is like social democracy. His position used to be in favor of a parliamentary system, as shown by the fact that he initially supported a Constitution that gave the Prime Minister executive power. However, he later changed his mind and now supports a presidential system with a decentralized power structure, which is what Kenya’s current constitution shows. Odinga is seen as one of the main people behind devolution, which is now a key part of Kenya’s government and is written into the country’s Constitution.

People thought that all of the governments that came after the first one had used their power to favor certain areas based on politics or ethnicity, while denying other areas access to resources and development because of their ethnicity or because they were thought to be disloyal. Devolution was meant to fix this problem and make sure that each region got its fair share of resources, no matter what party they were in or what race they were. Due to a bad economy and a very bad drought, Odinga has asked for taxes on fuels and some foods that hurt the poor the most to be stopped.

Odinga has supported an element of state welfare in the form of cash-transfer programs for low-income people. This is already happening, but only for a small number of poor, older people. Odinga has been more conservative, though, when it comes to social issues. Odinga said about LGBT issues, “The constitution is very clear on this issue, and men or women caught being gay will not be spared.” He also said, “If we find a man being gay or a woman being lesbian, we’ll arrest them and put them in jail.” LGBT activists were very angry about these comments. They said that his words put the lives of LGBT Kenyans in danger. Odinga’s office said that he only meant to say that same-sex marriage is against the law, which is what the Constitution says.

Personal life

Odinga’s political philosophy is more like American left-wing politics than it is like social democracy. His position used to be in favor of a parliamentary system, as shown by the fact that he initially supported a Constitution that gave the Prime Minister executive power.

However, he later changed his mind and now supports a presidential system with a decentralized power structure, which is what Kenya’s current constitution shows. Odinga is seen as one of the main people behind devolution, which is now a key part of Kenya’s government and is written into the country’s Constitution.

People thought that all of the governments that came after the first one had used their power to favor certain areas based on politics or ethnicity, while denying other areas access to resources and development because of their ethnicity or because they were thought to be disloyal. Devolution was meant to fix this problem and make sure that each region got its fair share of resources, no matter what party they were in or what race they were. Due to a bad economy and a very bad drought, Odinga has asked for taxes on fuels and some foods that hurt the poor the most to be stopped.

Odinga has been in favor of giving low-income people cash transfers as a form of state welfare. This is already happening, but only for a small number of poor, older people. Odinga has been more conservative, though, when it comes to social issues. Odinga said about LGBT issues, “The constitution is very clear on this issue, and men or women caught being gay will not be spared.” He also said, “If we find a man being gay or a woman being lesbian, we’ll arrest them and put them in jail.” LGBT activists were very angry about these comments.

They said that his words put the lives of LGBT Kenyans in danger. Odinga’s office said that he only meant to say that same-sex marriage is against the law, which is what the Constitution says.

Who is the father of Raila Odinga?

Jaramogi Ajuma Oginga Odinga was a chieftain from the Luo tribe who played a major role in Kenya’s fight for independence. He went on to be Kenya’s first Vice-President and then the leader of the opposition.

Who is Raila Odinga wife?

Ida Betty Odinga is a businesswoman, activist, and teacher from Kenya. She was born Ida Anyango Oyoo on August 24, 1950. She is married to Raila Odinga, who used to be Kenya’s prime minister and is now the leader of the National Super Alliance (NASA).
Where does Raila comes from?
Kisumu, the third largest city in Kenya, has a town called Maseno. It is 25 kilometers from the provincial capital and is on the road between Kisumu and Busia. It is in the north west ward. A different road goes from Maseno to the town of Vihiga, which is 15 kilometers east of Maseno. Maseno is on the line of the equator.
Honours and awards

Honorary degrees

Name Of Institutions Country of Study Degree Year
University of Nairobi Kenya Doctor of Laws 2008
Florida A&M University United States Honorary degree 2012
Limkokwing University of Creative Technology Malaysia Doctorate of Leadership in Social Development 2012

 

Kenya election 2022: Raila Odinga rejects William Ruto’s victory

The official results show that Mr. Odinga lost by a small margin to Deputy President William Ruto. Mr. Odinga said that the head of the voting body was “clearly ignoring the constitution.” “We reject the results of the presidential election completely and without any reservations,” he said. In front of his supporters in Nairobi, the capital, he said, “There is neither a legally elected winner nor a president-elect.” The long-time leader of the opposition, who was 77 years old, ran for president for the fifth time. He has contested the results of the last two elections, and in 2017 he was successful. This time, the head of the election board, Wafula Chebukati, said that Mr. Ruto got 50.5% of the vote, while Mr. Chebukati got 48.8%.

Mr. Odinga said that Mr. Chebukati was acting with “gross impunity,” and he said that his team would look into all legal options. He said that what he said was “a major setback” for Kenya’s democracy and could lead to a political crisis. He said that Mr. Chebukati broke the law when he announced the result without the support of the other commissioners. Musalia Mudavadi, a friend of Mr. Ruto, told BBC Focus on Africa radio that the job of the commissioners is to collect the results, not to decide the outcome. This is a legal question that may have to be settled in court in the end.

Four of the seven electoral commissioners who didn’t agree with Monday’s results held a press conference minutes before Mr. Odinga spoke to explain why. They said that Mr. Chebukati had put them in the background and given results that were “a mathematical absurdity that defies logic.” Juliana Cherera, who is the vice chair of the commission, said that if you added up the percentages given by the chair of the commission, the total was 100.01 percent. But the BBC’s Reality Check team says this was due to a rounding error and is not suspicious.

But Mr. Odinga has praised the four commissioners for being “brave.” “We are proud of the majority of (the electoral commission) who stood up to Mr. Chebukati’s bullying and illegal actions, and we want them to know that they don’t need to be afraid of anything.

Kenyans back them up, “he said. On Monday, Mr. Ruto called the commissioners’ complaints a “sideshow,” but he said he would follow the law. He also called for unity, saying that he wanted to be a president for everyone and that the country should focus on the future.

The election last week was mostly peaceful. People liked that the electoral commission made the voting process clear by putting the results from more than 46,000 polling stations on its website and encouraging anyone to do their own count. But on Monday, fights broke out at the counting center when Mr. Odinga’s supporters said that the electoral commission had messed with the votes and tried to stop Mr. Chebukati from announcing the final results.

At least three people who worked at the polls were hurt in the fight. After the official announcement of the presidential results, there was a mix of celebrations and violent protests. Now, the country is back to normal. In the Rift Valley city of Eldoret, a lot of Mr. Ruto’s supporters wore yellow, which is the color of his party.

In the city of Kisumu in the west, on the other hand, people who supported Mr. Odinga blocked roads and lit bonfires. Similar things happened in several towns and in Nairobi, the capital. Most of the time, people are glad that the counting process is over because life tends to slow down during election season. But Mr. Odinga’s plan to take a case to the Supreme Court will get people’s attention.

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